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Justine Salam , Hany Besada

Abstract

China is in dire need of energy resources to sustain its growth. Inrecent years, China has been turning more to Saudi Arabia and Iran in the MiddleEast as well as Sudan in North Africa as trade partners to secure its energy supplyand fuel its increasing growth. This paper explores China’s energy policy in theMiddle East and North African (MENA) region by studying three cases: Sudanin North Africa, and Saudi Arabia and Iran in the Middle East. Data was obtainedfrom review of relevant literature. It is found out that China’s oil policy is verymuch driven by the Beijing Consensus. China has applied an equity ownershipstrategy to have more control over oil flows as a shield against price fluctuationsand to reduce supply interruption. Civil unrest and conflicts in the MENA regionthreatens to disrupt China’s energy supply channels, which implies that Chinashould work for peace in the MENA region to achieve its sustainable energysupply.

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Keywords

Chinese diplomacy
energy policy
Middle East
North Africa
oil politics

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